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Yearly Archives: 2014

This article is sponsored by Coloplast.

Men who experience urinary incontinence, or the accidental leakage of urine, are often plagued with embarassment and frustration over their condition. Urinary leakage or ”dribbling” is unpredictable and the ability to choose a dependable product is critical. Often, the first ”go-to” product is absorbent pads or diapers, however there are other options available that may prove to be more successful.

2 of 3 men prefer Conveen® Optima to diapers*

Male external catheters (also known as condom catheters or urisheaths), used with a urine collection bag, offer a comfortable and discreet method of managing male urinary incontinence.

Coloplast Optima 3 Image
A customized incontinence solution

Conveen by Coloplast allows you to customize a solution to meet your specific needs and lifestyle. Conveen Optima is a male external catheter suitable for light to severe incontinence and may be worn up to 24 hours. The sheath is self-adhesive for ease of use and to protect against leakage. Application and removal are easy, with the help of the double grip-strip and balanced adhesive. Because a secure fit (circumference and length) is critical to success with male external catheters, Coloplast offers Optima in several sizes.

Conveen Optima

  • Reliable and discreet
  • Customizable to your needs
  • An alternative to absorbents or diapers

Allegro Medical and Coloplast have partnered to offer you this truly unique product. For more information about Conveen Optima, click here. To place an order, visit AllegroMedical.com.

About Coloplast

Coloplast is a global medical device company that develops products and services designed to make life easier for people with very personal and private medical conditions. We start by listening to our users to better understand their needs and then respond by bringing the best ideas to market in the form of medical devices and service solutions. Coloplast’s design awards speak to its innovation: Conveen® Optima won the Medical Design Excellence award and SpeediCath® Compact Set was awarded the prestigious Red Dot design award. With SpeediCath, Coloplast was the first to develop an instantly ready-to-use catheter, the first to develop a compact catheter for women, and the first to develop an all-in-one compact catheter and bag solution. In addition to continence care, Coloplast’s businesses include urology care, ostomy care, and wound and skin care.

With the development of a strong portfolio of new products and investments in a professional sales force, we now employ more than 8,000 people worldwide. In 2012 and 2013, Coloplast received global recognition for having the best corporate reputation among patients (PatientView), and for being the Most Ethical (Ethisphere Institute) and Most Sustainable (StoreBrand Bank) company. Coloplast is also a finalist for the PM360 Trailblazer Medical Device Company of the Year award, which recognizes achievement in innovation, talent development and social responsibility.

*Chartier-Kastler E et al: Randomized, crossover, prospective, multicenter study comparing quality of life related to the use of urinary sheaths versus diapers in incontinent men, British Journal of Urology, accepted for online publication Sep. 2010

1 out of 3 women and 1 out of 8 men experience an unexpected leak sometime in their lives.tena-logo With the large array of TENA products you can live your life without worrying about unexpected leaks.

TENA has you covered whether you are a man, woman, skinny or plus size. For women TENA carries pantiliners, pads, underwear and briefs. For men, TENA carries guards, underwear and briefs.

Bariatric BriefTENA carries a new bariatric brief that comes in both 2X and 3X sizes. It can handle moderate to heavy incontinence and fecal incontinence. It features hook tabs for unlimited refastening and ensures your comfort. They also have a transfer layer that helps keep the skin dry and healthy.

For general protection of a bed, chair or a couch try the very popular TENA underpads. TENA Underpads These underpads consist of a polyethylene layer combined with sealed edges to ensure leakage protection. They also feature a fluff pad, non-woven top sheet to keep you dry when it matters.

With TENA products you can live your life the way you want to. Go for a long walk or a day at the museum. With TENA guarding you from the unexpected leak you can do it all.

Our customers have asked and Allegro Medical has listened! We are now proud to announce we are staffed with bilingual customer service representatives that are here to help you with your every need. Our friendly customer service center now staffs representatives that speak Spanish! We understand the frustration one can have while shopping online where one may have specific questions but struggle finding someone to call to assist. Don’t be afraid to give us a call at 1-800-861-3211!  We are available from 7am to 7pm Central Standard Time from Monday through Friday.

Nuestros clientes han pedido y Allegro Medical ha escuchado! Ahora estamos orgullosos de anunciar que cuentan con personal de representantes de servicio al cliente bilingües que están aquí para ayudarle con todas sus necesidades. Nuestro amable centro de servicio al cliente ahora tiene representantes que hablan español! Entendemos la frustración que uno puede tener mientras que hace las compras en línea donde uno puede tener preguntas específicas, pero luchar para encontrar a alguien que llame para ayudar. No tenga miedo de darnos una llamada al 1-800-861-3211!

Since 1997 Allegro Medical has been a leading supplier of  medical products.  If you are looking for an extensive selection of medical products, rely on AllegroMedical.com for all of your needs!

Summer time is here to stay with record breaking temperatures and what better way to cool off than jumping in a pool. Being in the water has more benefits than just cooling down and having fun. People from all around the world use water as a form of exercise and therapy. People with muscle and joint pain often find exercising unpleasant and turn to water therapy as a relief. The largest benefit of doing water therapy and exercises is that when you’re submerged in deep water, you unload 90% of your body weight through water buoyancy1. By decreasing the amount of joint stress it is easier and less painful to perform exercises. People with a weight problem often find working out in water pleasant as the water environment soothes and supports their muscles and joints while staying cool.

Water therapy covers a broad set of techniques including aquatic exercise, physical therapy, bodywork, and body movement based therapy in water. There are products that assist in these exercises such as resistance based weights and noodles. These resistance items allow for muscle strengthening without the need of actual weights. Using these products in conjunction with waters buoyancy allows a person to strengthen and repair the body without joint stress that can’t be experienced on land 2.

AquaJogger Active Starter Kit

AquaJogger-Active-Starter-Kit-196873-PRODUCT-MEDIUM_IMAGE

This active starter kit is a complete system for a total body resistance workout. While breathing naturally above water, a person can move freely underwater and perform a multitude of workouts. This kit comes with resistance dumbbells, cuffs, and a belt to assist with ones aerobic therapy.

 

 

SEAL-TIGHT Sport Cast and Bandage Protector

SEAL-TIGHT-Sport-Cast-and-Bandage-Protector-Adult-557183-PRODUCT-MEDIUM_IMAGE
These body wraps are great if you need to do water exercises but are suffering with a cast or open wound. Seal-Tight Sport is a safe, economical protector for casts and bandages during recreational water activities or daily showering and bathing. With regular care, these last for three to four weeks of daily usage.

 

 

AquaJogger-Scoodle-Water-Noodle-556619-PRODUCT-MEDIUM_IMAGE

AquaJogger Sqoodle Water Noodle

Standard water noodles are hard to use due to their round shape as they’re hard to keep under oneself. This noodle is square so it offers a no roll design to sit, kneel, stand or float on it. This item has more buoyancy for more support and more resistance than other regular noodles due to the high density EVA foam.

 

“I love this noodle. Not only can I use it during aquatic therapy, but I can also use it for balance and stabilization exercises. It’s a fraction of the cost of a foam balance beam, and more comfortable to lie on than foam rollers.” by DPT from Augusta, GA

Since 1997 Allegro Medical has been a leading supplier of  therapeutic products.  If you are looking for hydrotherapy products, rely on AllegroMedical.com for all of your needs.

  1. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aquatic_therapy
  2. http://physicaltherapy.about.com/od/strengtheningexercises/a/aquatictherapy.htm

People with medical heat intolerance conditions such as multiple sclerosis (MS) can feel their symptoms become worse when their body temperature increases. Many people can feel much worse by just a half degree difference in temperature! MS research has proven that heat and humidity often aggravate common MS symptoms 1. This is where body cooling systems give relief to people experiencing MS symptoms. Now there is no reason to be stuck inside on a warm summer afternoon as these cooling systems gives freedom back to those who enjoy the outdoors.

The body cooling systems are not just for people with medical conditions but have been used by many different people. Cooling the body can be beneficial for emergency response workers, military personnel, athletes, industrial workers, or people with outdoor jobs 2. The nice thing about cooling products is that they’re discreet and provide relief for hours. There are many different options giving people the ability to stay active while cooling.

Kool Max Zipper Front Cooling Vest

vestThe most common cooling product is a full size vest that contains insulated pockets which hold small cool worn over your regular clothing and provide a temporary cooling relief which can last up to a few hours. These vests have many different cool pack locations so the individual can place the packs where they’re most needed. The cooling packs cool up to 3-4 hours in any climate and are thin so they don’t protrude your clothing. These are believed to be the most cost effective cooling items however they require access to a freezer.packs. The vests are typically 

One of the worst things about having MS is feeling like a prisoner to the AC in the summertime. I am very active bike riding, gardening etc and it’s all thanks to this vest! Heck I’m even doing housework in it. Love love love it! – Becky S

 

Cooling Baseball Cap with Evaporative Insert

hat

This fashionable hat works great for work or any activity. You can even retrofit the cool pack to your own hat! Evaporate cooling is another effective way to cool during the warm weather but are ideal for low humidity days and dry climates. Garments are designed to be briefly soaked in water causing a natural cooling effect as it evaporates.  These are lightweight and contain cooling beads that will cool for hours. As long as there is a cold source of water nearby, this will keep one cool all day long. This works by that the temperature of dry air can be dropped significantly through the phase change of liquid water to water vapor (evaporation). You will see similar effects of misters out on patios in southern states.

Cool Kids Cooling Vest – Cool 58 packs

Cool 58 Kid Vest

Cooling products are not just for adults but even for kids! The phase change technology in the Cool 58 packs are great for long term cooling when you’re not near a freezer. These cooling packs freeze at a moderate temperature of 58 degrees and cool at this constant temperature. They can be activated in ice water or the refrigerator and cool up to 2-3 hours in any climate. They use less cooling energy than the traditional cool packs due to the gel composition and freeze point. Keep a container of ice water with you on your travels and be cool and dry for hours on end.

 

 

 

Since 1997 Allegro Medical has been a leading supplier of body cooling and multiple sclerosis relief products.  If you are suffering from medical heat intolerance conditions, rely on AllegroMedical.com for all of your body cooling needs.

 

 

  1. http://www.mymsaa.org/msaa-help/cooling/
  2. http://ms.about.com/od/resources/tp/ms_cooling.htm

A new feature to the AllegroMedical.com website just made shopping with us a little easier. If you are not ready to complete your order, or decide to wait to purchase an item in your shopping cart, simply click the “Save for Later” link under the item. With our new Save for Later feature, you can now choose to move an item from your shopping cart and save it to be purchased the next time your return. The item will show up in your Saved for Later section of the shopping cart making purchasing it next time you visit a snap.

I was recently asked to write an article for our friends at the Long Term Living Magazine on the topic of patient care and exercise for mobility challenged patients. It’s an interesting topic and something that deserves focus. Exercise remains a critical component of our lives, no matter what our age or capability. Most all of us are capable of doing some sort of exercise and just might need to think creatively to find the right solution for more challenging cases. Below is the article that was published in the Long Term Living Magazine 5/29/2014. Please enjoy!

Long-term care (LTC) residents who rely on wheelchairs for mobility run a greater risk of diminished mental
acuity and depression, as well as complicated health issues, including Type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure
and coronary heart disease. Pressure sores may develop on those who are confined to a wheelchair, and
excess weight gained from a sedentary life adds strain on the joints of the musculoskeletal system,
contributing to osteoarthritis.

A Journal of the American Geriatric Society study shows that inactive women at age 65 have a life expectancy of 12.7 years, whereas active, nonsmoking women at 65 have a life expectancy of 18.4 years. Other studies have shown that strength training was as effective as medication in reducing depression in older adults.
For residents in wheelchairs, physical exercise is essential for increasing blood circulation, spine stability, posture and
flexibility. Exercise generates endorphins, body awareness and muscle strength while relieving stress and enhancing self esteem for a healthier and happier life. What’s more, exercise improves a resident’s ability to achieve a deeper and more restful sleep, which is essential for preserving emotional and physical health.

For some residents, medical conditions may exclude certain chair exercises. Also, for those just starting exercise regimens, it is imperative that each person discusses his or her individual exercise plan with a physician, who can offer some suggestions or prohibit chair exercises that may be either too strenuous or too likely to aggravate an existing medical condition.

HELPING LTC RESIDENTS HELP THEMSELVES
Regardless of the resident’s age, physical condition or whether he or she ever has exercised in the past, several techniques can help a resident overcome his or her mobility issues. Be sure to consult with a physician to determine what exercises are appropriate for each resident. Any type of exercise will benefit a person’s health but, in general, clinicians should aim to incorporate these important types of exercise into the wheelchair user’s routine:

Basic leg crosses. Leg crosses are good options for seniors who have at least mid-range leg strength. The goal is to simply get the muscles working.

  • Have the patient carefully kick his or her leg out.
  • Have the person cross the legs and then alternate.
  • Repeat this task a number of times.
  • Finish up the exercises with ankle circles.

Cardiovascular. A series of seated, repetitive movements will raise the resident’s heart rate and help to burn calories.

  • Wrap a lightweight resistance band under the wheelchair and have the resident perform resistance exercises, such as chest presses, for a count of one second up and two seconds down. Have him or her try several different exercises to start, with 20 to 30 reps per exercise, and gradually increase the number of exercises, reps and total workout time as endurance improves.
  • Have the resident punch the air with or without hand weights.

Strength training. If the resident has limited mobility in his or her legs, focus on building upper body strength.

  • Have the individual sit straight up in the wheelchair and lift up both arms toward the ceiling, and then slowly move them back down. Alternate the movement by lifting up one arm while the other is stretched out toward the ground, similar to picking apples off a tree. Repeat these movements eight times.
  • Have him or her perform exercises such as shoulder presses, bicep curls and triceps extensions using light weights. Aim for two to three sets of 8 to 12 repetitions for each exercise, adding weight and more exercises as strength improves.
  • Resistance bands can be attached to furniture, a doorknob or the wheelchair. They can be used for pull-downs,shoulder rotations and arm and leg-extensions.

Flexibility. Flexibility is important for enhancing range of motion, preventing injury and reducing pain and stiffness. Even with limited mobility in the legs, a resident still can benefit from stretches and flexibility exercises to prevent or delay further muscle atrophy.

  • Stretching can be performed by having the resident use the floor or his or her body weight to provide resistance to the muscle group being stretched. An occupational therapist should be on hand to help target musclesand joints by helping the person stretch beyond his or her usual range of motion.

Chair Chi. This exercise program is based on the principals of Tai Chi and Qi Gong but designed for residents in LTC
environments. Chair Chi requires no special equipment but can be used to help people receive the benefits of traditional Tai

Chi and Qi Gong.
Most movement in Chair Chi begins and ends with the muscles and back, and can include any number of poses. Motion
remains mostly slow—the slower, the better the results. Working against gravity, the body weight provides resistance as
great as some weight-bearing activities and, according to the Mayo Clinic, Chair Chi is a zero-impact exercise.
Yoga. Most yoga poses can be modified or adapted depending on the resident’s physical condition, weight, age, medical
condition and any injury or disability. Wheelchair yoga is an exceptional option for residents with chronic obstructive
pulmonary disease or multiple sclerosis.
Exercising is equally important for wheelchair users as it is for able-bodied LTC residents, and perhaps even more important given their susceptibility to other conditions. Despite the mobility restrictions wheelchair users face, wheelchair exercise can be a rewarding way of maintaining good health and mental ability. As a group activity, exercise for wheelchair users also can serve as a fun social activity that can be integrated into a daily and weekly schedule.
Getting wheelchair users on a consistent exercise routine tailored to their needs and abilities will help them attain better flexibility and range of motion, greater strength and energy, relief from pain and increased tranquility. It can also help improve breathing capacity for residents with asthma and emphysema, while burning fat and calories, lowering cholesterol and helping to alleviate symptoms of osteoporosis, osteoarthritis, arthritis, bursitis, tendonitis, fibro/polymyalgia and neuropathy.

Falling at any age is a frightening experience.  Parents with toddlers do all they can to minimize injuries from falls.  Helmets are no longer just for professional bicyclists, all ages wear them to mitigate head injuries from falls.  They’ve become the status quo.  Seniors are especially vulnerable to falls and each year, one in three elderly adults age 65 or older will experience a fall according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).1   Older adults need help to reduce the risk of falling, especially in the bathroom where a few simple additions can help your loved one remain independent and safe.

Abelware® independent living products are known for innovation and ease of use.  AllegroMedical.com recommends three popular Abelwsliding-rotating-bathroom-transfer-bench-567106-MEDIUM_0are® bathroom assist items to help prevent falls by making your bathroom safer.

 

Sliding Rotating Transfer Bench –is the newest innovation of the Abelware® line of bathroom benches.  The smooth sliding feature allows a person to glide across the bench with minimal effort to gain safe entry into a bathtub or shower while the rotating swivel top easily transfers the person into the bathing area.  This bench completely eliminates the risk of falling while trying to step over a shower ledge or into a bathtub.

Extra Wide Tall-Ette Elevated Toilet Seat with Aluminum Legs – is designed to help users with lower extremity weakness or balance issues.  This elevated toilet seat provides stability while moving from a sit-stand or stand-sit position.

Extra Wide Raised Toilet Seat with Aluminum Legs

Extra Wide Raised Toilet Seat with Aluminum Legs

 

Groovy Grip Grab Bars – are attractive, plastic, wall mounted grab bars with a grooved surface that provide a non-slip grasp even while wet.  Grab bars are a necessity in bathrooms to help individuals maintain balance.

The addition of these bath safety items will give you piece-of-mind and help you keep your elderly loved one or patient from becoming another fall statistic.  AllegroMedical.com is here to help keep your senior parents or patients independent and safe.

 

1 http://www.cdc.gov/homeandrecreationalsafety/falls/adultfalls.html

wheelchair exercise for the elderly

Nursing home residents are physically frail, and possibly approaching the end of their lives. So what’s the point of exercise, especially for someone in a wheelchair?  Too often, I believe, professionals and staff in long-term care environments accept this defeatist attitude.

Unfortunately, this then passes on to the resident and becomes a self-fulfilling prophecy: Long-term care residents in wheelchairs avoid exercise and decline further.

Lack of activity leads to joint degeneration, heart problems, stroke, congestive heart failure, diabetes, and a range of other chronic medical conditions including blood clots and painful, persistent pressure sores.

On the other hand, study after study lately has shown that exercise, even by frail elders, improves cardiovascular health, cognition, and overall quality of life. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says that exercise benefits people with arthritis by reducing pain, delaying disability, and improving mobility, function, and mood. Other studies have shown that strength training was as effective as medication in reducing depression in older adults. It can help improve breathing for residents with asthma and emphysema, while burning fat and calories, lowering cholesterol, and helping to alleviate symptoms of osteoporosis, osteoarthritis, arthritis, bursitis, tendonitis, fibro/polymyalgia, and neuropathy.

 

Obviously, nursing home residents in wheelchairs are as prone as anyone to sedentary living. One of the most common consequences of using a wheelchair is weight gain, resulting from a more sedentary lifestyle. Yet even for this population, physical exercise is essential for increasing blood circulation, spine stability, posture, and flexibility.

Exercise generates endorphins, body awareness, and muscle strength, while relieving stress and enhancing self-esteem. What’s more, exercise improves a patient’s ability to achieve a deeper and more restful sleep, which is essential for preserving emotional and physical health.

For some residents, medical conditions may exclude certain chair exercises. Also, for those just starting out their exercise regimens, it is imperative to discuss any exercise plan with a physician. Yet in my years as a rehabilitation specialist caring for individuals recovering from strokes and traumatic brain injury, and now as a supplier of wheelchairs to people needing them, I have concluded that, regardless of the resident’s age, physical condition, or whether or not the person exercised in the past, there are a number of techniques for helping a chair-bound individual overcome mobility issues.

Exercises for Wheelchair Users

Any type of exercise will benefit wheelchair-bound residents’ health, but in general, clinicians should aim to incorporate these important types of exercise into their routines:

Basic Leg Crosses — These are good options for seniors who have at least mid-range leg strength. The goal is to simply get the muscles working.

  • Have the patient carefully kick one leg out, cross the legs, and then alternate. Repeat this task a number of times. Finish up the exercises with ankle circles.

Cardiovascular – A series of seated repetitive movements will raise the patient’s heart rate and help the person burn calories.

  • Wrap a lightweight resistance band under the wheel chair and have the resident perform resistance exercises, such as chest presses, for a count of one second up and two seconds down. Have the person try several different exercises to start, with 20 to 30 reps per exercise, and gradually increase the number of exercises, reps, and total workout time as endurance improves.
  • Have the wheelchair bound resident punch the air with or without hand weights.

Strength Training – If the resident has limited mobility in his or her legs, focus on building upper body strength.

  • Have the person sit straight in the wheelchair and lift both arms toward the ceiling and then slowly bring them back down. Have them alternate the movement by lifting up one arm while the other is stretched out toward the ground, similar to picking apples off a tree. Repeat these movements 8 times each.
  • Have the person do shoulder presses, bicep curls, and triceps extensions using light weights. Aim for 2 to 3 sets of 8 to 12 repetitions for each exercise, adding weight and more exercises as strength improves.
  • Instead of weights, resistance bands can be attached to furniture, a doorknob, or the wheelchair. They can be used for pull-downs, shoulder rotations, and arm and leg-extensions.

Flexibility is important for enhancing range of motion, preventing injury, and reducing pain and stiffness. Even with limited mobility in the legs, a resident can delay further muscle atrophy by stretching. Stretching can be performed by having the resident use the floor or their body weight to provide resistance to the muscle group being stretched. An occupational therapist should be on hand to help them target muscles and joints and to stretch beyond their usual range of motion.

 

  • Chair Chi is an exercise program based on the principals of Tai Chi and Qi Gong, tailored to people in long-term care environments. Requiring no special equipment, the movements are circular and never forced; the muscles are relaxed rather than tensed; and the joints are not fully extended or bent. Motion remains mostly slow – the slower, the better. Working against the body’s weight provides resistance as great as some weight lifting, with zero impact.

 

  • Yoga poses can be modified or adapted to the resident’s physical condition, weight, age, medical condition, and any injury or disability. Wheelchair yoga is an exceptional option for residents with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or multiple sclerosis.

 

Exercising is just as important, and perhaps even more important, for wheelchair users as for able-bodied long-term care residents. Despite mobility restrictions, wheelchair users can find exercise a rewarding way of maintaining good health and mental ability. As a group activity, wheelchair exercise also can serve as a social activity in the weekly schedule.

 

Better flexibility and range of motion, greater strength and energy, improved breathing capacity, relief from pain, increased tranquility—who would want to deny any of that to a person just because he or she is sitting in a wheelchair?

 

About the Author

Craig Hood is executive vice president of Allegro Medical, a supplier of home medical supplies and equipment. He has worked as a rehabilitation specialist caring for individuals recovering from strokes and traumatic brain injury. He formed Allegro Medical to supply products for post-acute care and the treatment of chronic conditions.

“Help is at hand” was the title to the recent New York Post article that featured a number of AllegroMedical.com’s innovative home medical products that make life easier for those with limited mobility. In my interview with the newspaper, I was challenged to highlight a handful of products that have dramatically enhanced the lives of people living with disabilities of physical challenges. Considering that we offer over 37,000 products on our website, and add thousands of new products each year, choosing the top 10 was not easy.

 

Our picks for the New York Post segment all stand out to me in 2 key ways:

1)   Improvement of mobility

2)   Increased Independence

Better mobility and enhanced independence leads to improved quality of life. In some of these products the genius seems so simple.  These great products make so much sense, that when you look at them, you can’t help but say, “ I wish I thought of that!”

Take a look at the items we highlighted as most helpful for the New York Post and visit www.AllegroMedical.com to find countless other innovative health care products.

Product #1)

The Maddak Sliding Rotating Transfer Bench –

A design possibly inspired by Disneyland’s Tea Cups ride, this transfer bench allows the user to glide the expanse across the bathtub edge and then easily rotate into a comfortable position for showering. Also notable, this product manufactured by Maddak is made in the USA.

Product #2)

The UpEasy Seat Assist –

This product is the equivalent of having a friend in your living room to lend a hand whenever the need arises to get up from your favorite chair. A set of pistons store the energy captured when sitting down on the padded seat cushion. When it’s time to get up, the struts provide a boost to the seat helping you reach a standing position.

Product #3)

The Luggie FreeRider Portable Mobility Scooter –

Like something out of a James Bond movie, this micro mobility scooter folds down into its own suite case, not much bigger than airplane carry-on bag. If 007 were ever issued a mobility scooter it would have to be the Luggie FreeRider.

Product #4)

The Inogen One G3 Portable Oxygen Concentrator –

Oxygen concentrators produce an endless supply of O2 for patients at home but are tethered to an electrical outlet. Portable oxygen tanks offer users mobility but only until the tanks run dry. The Inogen One G3 is the best of both worlds. It is a back pack sized oxygen concentrator that can continuously produce O2 for patients for up to 9 hours on a single charge of its double pack. If required, the unit can also be plugged into a car power source or standard wall outlet and run indefinitely.

Product #5)

The SimpliciKey Electronic Door Lock –

Loss of dexterity from age, arthritis or other conditions can make something as simple as turning the deadbolt lock on your front door a challenge. The SimpliciKey is a motorized deadbolt lock that can be operated by a remote pendant with just 2 buttons; open and close.

Product #6)

Michael Graves Suction Cup Grab Bars –

These grab bars install without tools and provide a sturdy hand-hold in any bathroom shower. The innovative design allows the grab bars to be positioned in any number of ways to ensure safe entry and exit from the bath or shower. The design also incorporates a sensor mechanism that indicates the strength of the suction. If it does not have a good grip on the surface, it tells you.

Product #7)

ABENA Abri Premium Adult Briefs –

The European company ABENA is making fast inroads into the US with their line of ultra-comfortable adult incontinence briefs. Made from Air Plus, their patented soft material, the Abri adult briefs are more comfortable than the standard adult pull-ups on the market. With the addition of stronger elastic in the waist and crotch, and layers of moisture trapping fabric, the Abri has more capacity than other products in the same class. From a recent survey of incontinence users done by Allegro Medical, we found that comfort was the biggest consideration when buying incontinence products followed closely by capacity. The Abri Premium Adult Briefs score high in both categories.

Product #8)

iHealth Wireless Arm Blood Pressure Monitor –

Monitoring your personal health is getting easier with the introduction of wireless health monitors by iHealth. This blood pressure monitor transmits information directly to your mobile device, allowing you to measure and track your systolic/diastolic numbers, heart rate, pulse wave, and measurement time.

Product #9)

iHealth Wireless Pulse Oximeter –

Like the iHealth blood pressure monitor, this Pulse Oximeter transmits vital information wirelessly to your mobile device, reporting on oxygen saturation levels and pulse rate. Part of a family of 3 innovative wireless health monitors, the pulse oximeter makes it easy and quick to get readings and then email results to physicians and caregivers.

Product #10)

iHealth Wireless Activity and Sleep Tracker –

Wearable activity monitors are becoming more widely used and the iHealth Wireless Activity monitor is one of the latest to hit the market. It tracks walking, running, distance traveled and calories burned. It also tracks your sleep efficiency, or how restful you slumber, which has a direct impact on health.
Wireless technology in health devices and mobile apps will continue to emerge in 2014. Don’t be surprised if these products begin communicating with each other, creating an even smarter interconnected view of our total health picture.

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