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Craig Hood

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Craig Hood is the Founder of Allegro Medical. Craig worked as a caregiver for adults with developmental disabilities in Tucson, Arizona and later, as a rehabilitation specialist caring for individuals recovering from strokes and traumatic brain injury in Scottsdale, Arizona. After getting his business degree from Arizona State University, Craig worked in the high tech industry for several years before starting Allegro Medical. Drawing on his experience as a caregiver, Craig realized how important medical products and supplies were in the treatment of post-acute care conditions. At the time, the products to help his patients were not always readily available to professionals and family members. His experience gave him the idea that there should be a better way to shop for medical supplies, and health and wellness products. In 1997, Craig launched AllegroMedical.com as the nation's first online supplier of medical supplies, incontinence products, wound care supplies, daily living aids, orthopedic products, wheelchairs and so much more. The first AllegroMedical.com website had only 500 products. Today AllegroMedical.com offers over 30,000 items and unique ways of shopping including, shopping by condition and shopping by body part. Allegro Medical is America's first and largest online medical supply superstore.

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ALLEGRO MEDICAL’S

“20 YEAR ANNIVERSARY” SWEEPSTAKES

OFFICIAL RULES

 

NO PURCHASE IS NECESSARY TO ENTER OR WIN THIS SWEEPSTAKES. A PURCHASE WILL NOT INCREASE YOUR CHANCES OF WINNING.

 

  1. ELIGIBILITY: This Sweepstakes is open only to legal residents of the Fifty (50) United States and the District of Columbia, who are 18 years of age or older at the time of entry. You need not be present to win. Employees (and their immediate families or those living in the same household) of Allegro Medical (“Sponsor”) and its respective affiliates, subsidiaries, divisions, parent and related companies, suppliers, printers and advertising, promotional and judging agencies are not eligible to enter or win.

 

  1. HOW TO ENTER: Sweepstakes begins at 12:01 a.m. EDT on November 15, 2016 EDT and ends at 11:59 p.m. EST on December 15, 2016. You may enter this Sweepstakes via either the on-line or mail-in entry methods described below. Regardless of entry method, you may enter only once. All entries must be received by 11:59 p.m. EST of the last day of the Sweepstakes, i.e. December 15, 2016, whether submitted on‑line or mailed. Proof of depositing entry in mail is not considered proof of delivery or receipt. No photocopied or mechanically reproduced entries will be accepted. Illegible, incomplete and duplicate entries will be disqualified. Entries will not be accepted from post office boxes. All entries become the property of Sponsor and will not be returned.

 

  1. ON-LINE ENTRY METHOD: Beginning on November 15, 2016, you may enter the Sweepstakes via the Internet by logging on to allegromedical.com and registering. You may be required to provide some or all of the following information: your name, address, city, state, zip code, telephone number, age, e-mail address and the metropolitan service area for which you are entering. On-line entrant must be the registered subscriber of the e‑mail account by which the entry is made. In the event of a dispute as to entries submitted by multiple users having the same e-mail account, the authorized subscriber of the e-mail account (as specified by the Internet Service Provider) used to enter the Sweepstakes at the actual time of entry will be deemed to be the entrant. Entries made by any individual or any entity other than the named entrant and/or originating at any other Internet Website, including (but not limited to) commercial sweepstakes subscription notification and/or entering service sites are void.

 

  1. MAIL-IN ENTRY METHOD: Alternatively, you may enter the Sweepstakes without registering, by hand-printing the words “20 Year Anniversary” Sweepstakes, your name, age, address, city, state, zip code, telephone number, and e-mail address (if applicable) on a 3” x 5” card and mailing it in an envelope to: “20 Year Anniversary” Sweepstakes, Allegro Medical, c/o Marketing Department, 360 Veterans Parkway, Suite 115, Bolingbrook, IL 60440.

PRIZES AND APPROXIMATE RETAIL VALUE: There will be 14 Prizes awarded. The Grand Prize consists solely of an E-Wheels EW-18 Stand-and-Ride Mobility Scooter. The approximate total retail value of the Grand Prize is $1,000.

All prizes are as follows:

 

Item# Description Apx. Value
EW-18R EW-18 Stand-N-Ride Mobility Scooter – Ready To Drive $999.00
21901901 2 Cases of Cure Medical Ultra Female Intermittent Catheter $774.00
15481901 5 Cases of Cure Medical® 29″ Extension Tube, Box of 30 $469.50
ST603OFT5SF_Royal Bl Shower Taxi Shower/Commode Chair – Blue $299.00
MDS806500 K4 Lightweight Wheelchair, EXCEL, K4, 18″, S / B DLA, S / A FT $283.30
ATC19-XX Lightweight Transport Wheelchair, 19” Seat $129.74
84221920 Coloplast Compact Set 12Fr – Male $124.75
64751900 Coloplast Compact Set 12Fr – Female $124.75
53013800 Sunmark Aluminum Rollator $122.56
47023110 Prevail Women’s Overnight Absorbent Underwear $71.50
11443300 Shower Bench sunmark® Econo $45.47
71713100 Prevail® Adult Disposable Washcloth – Soft Pack $36.00
74063100 Underpad McKesson Ultra 30 X 36 Inch Disposable $34.95
19191406 Lubricating Jelly McKesson 4 oz. Tube Sterile, Box of 12 $17.95
     
  1. The total value of all Prizes to be awarded is $3,500. All federal, state, and local tax liabilities are the sole responsibility of the Winner. Winner may be required to complete and return an IRS W-9 form (i.e. Request for Taxpayer Identification Number and Certification).

 

  1. RANDOM DRAWING: A total of Fourteen (14) Prize Winners will be selected in a random drawing from among all eligible entries, on or before December 20, 2016 by judges selected by Sponsor, whose decisions are final and binding in all matters relating to this Sweepstakes. The Prizes are guaranteed to be awarded. Only one Winner per household is permitted. Winners will be notified by telephone, e-mail or mail service by December 31, 2016.

 

  1. Prize conditions: No substitution for any prize will be permitted. If necessary due to unavailability of the Prize, a prize of equal or greater value will be awarded at the discretion of the Sponsor. Prize is not transferable, assignable or redeemable for cash. Winner will be required to execute and return an Affidavit of Eligibility and Publicity/Liability Release within fifteen (15) days of issuance. Failure to return all required documents in this time period may result in the Winner being disqualified and an alternate Winner selected. If a prize notification is returned to Sponsor as undeliverable or if an entrant is found to be ineligible or declines acceptance of the Prize for any reason, an alternate Winner will be selected. By entering this Sweepstakes and/or accepting the Prize, Winner and entrant hereby consent (except where prohibited by law) to the reasonable use by Sponsor of the Winners’ and entrants’ photograph, voice, likeness and/or image, hometown address, contents of the entry form and the name and age of the Winners and entrants without any further compensation for any future promotional activity related to this Sweepstakes.
  2. ODDS OF WINNING: Odds of winning a Prize depend on the total number of eligible entries received for the Sweepstakes and are equal regardless of method of entry.

 

  1. CONDUCT OF PARTICIPATION: By entering the Sweepstakes, entrant affirms that he or she has read and agrees to abide by the Official Sweepstakes Rules and the decisions of the judges. Sponsor reserves the right to disqualify any entrant acting in violation of the Official Rules or found tampering with the entry process or with the operation of the Sweepstakes or the website. The Sweepstakes is governed by the laws of the United States and, by entering, all Winners and entrants hereby submit to the jurisdiction and venue of the federal, state and local courts located in Chicago, Illinois. ANY ATTEMPT BY AN ENTRANT OR ANY OTHER INDIVIDUAL TO DELIBERATELY DAMAGE ANY WEB SITE RELATED TO SPONSOR OR THE SWEEPSTAKES OR UNDERMINE THE LEGITIMATE OPERATION OF THE SWEEPSTAKES MAY BE IN VIOLATION OF CRIMINAL AND CIVIL LAWS, AND SHOULD SUCH AN ATTEMPT BE MADE, SPONSOR RESERVES THE RIGHT TO SEEK DAMAGES FROM SUCH ENTRANT TO THE FULLEST EXTENT PERMITTED BY LAW.

 

  1. LIMITATIONS OF LIABILITY: Sponsor and each of its respective affiliates, subsidiaries, parent corporations, and their respective officers, directors, shareholders, employees and agents, are not responsible for any incorrect or inaccurate entry information, theft, tampering, destruction, or unauthorized access to, or alteration of entries; printing or other errors; and any entries or mail which are late, lost, delayed, incomplete, misdirected, stolen, mutilated, illegible, postage due or any combination thereof. Sponsor reserves the right to modify, suspend or terminate the Sweepstakes in the event that it becomes necessary due to circumstances beyond Sponsor’s control. In the event the Sweepstakes is terminated early, a winner will be selected from all eligible entries received at the time of termination.

 

  1. RELEASE OF LIABILITY: By participating, Winner and entrants agree to release, discharge, indemnify and hold harmless Sponsor and each of its respective affiliates, subsidiaries, parent corporations, and their officers, directors, employees, representatives and agents from and against any claims made by the Winner, entrants or any other third parties related in any way to the operation of this Sweepstakes, as well as any other claims, damages or liability due to any injuries, damages or losses (whether alleged, threatened, or actual) to any person (including death) or property of any kind resulting in whole or in part, directly or indirectly, from acceptance, possession, misuse or use of any prize or participation in any Sweepstakes-related activity or participation in this Sweepstakes.

 

  1. WINNERS LIST OR OFFICIAL RULES: For an Official Winners List (available after December 31, 2016) or a copy of these Official Rules, send a self-addressed, stamped envelope to: “20 Year Anniversary” Sweepstakes – WINNERS – or – OFFICIAL RULES (please specify), Allegro Medical, c/o Marketing Department, 360 Veterans Parkway, Suite 115, Bolingbrook, IL 60440. All requests must be received by May 15, 2017. Official Rules also available at allegromedical.com.

 

  1. ENTRANT’S PERSONAL INFORMATION: Information collected from entrants is subject to the Sponsor’s Privacy Policy which can be found at www.allegromedical.com.

 

  1. SPONSOR: Allegro Medical, 360 Veterans Parkway, Suite 115, Bolingbrook, IL 60440.

 

THIS SWEEPSTAKES IS VOID WHERE PROHIBITED OR RESTRICTED BY LAW.

 

Ó 2016 (ALLEGRO MEDICAL). All rights reserved.

 

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More than anyone, #Caregivers need to be efficient. So when it comes to mealtime, what better tool for efficiency than the #Pressure-Cooker. I just bought my first pressure cooker and need some inspiration for my maiden meal. Please share your favorite pressure cooker recipes me and others in our Caregiver Community!
 

minimed 670g image

The US Food and Drug Administration has approved Medtronic’s MiniMed 670G, a medical device that monitors a diabetic’s sugar levels, and then automatically injects the required dose of insulin.

This first-of-its kind automated insulin delivery system was approved for people over the age of 14 who have type 1 diabetes, and it’s poised to make life considerably easier for the millions of Americans who suffer from this condition.

More about the MIniMed 670G

incontinence image

Maggie Fox of NBC News Health writes that an injection of Botox works about as well as a surgically implanted device to help women with very severe incontinence, according to researchers.

It’s good news for women with severe urge incontinence, who can choose between treatments based on preference, said Dr. Cindy Amundsen of Duke University, who led the study.

“What we have learned from the study is the treatments are both good and it will just help inform physicians and patients who are trying to make a decision between these two therapies,” Amundsen said.

“We are actually not surprised that there isn’t a big difference between the two because both therapies are effective at relaxing the overactive bladder muscles.”

Women can choose between a surgical procedure, which is more expensive at first, versus regular Botox injections, which are less costly and less invasive but which could add up over time, Amundsen said.

Related: Many Adults Suffer Incontinence

The team studied women with severe incontinence who could not be helped with drugs or other treatments. The women in the study had to suffer at least six episodes of incontinence over three days.

The Botox injections freed 20 percent of the women in the study of incontinence, compared to 4 percent who had a nerve stimulator implant, Amundesen and colleagues reported in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

“Forty-six percent in the onabotulinumtoxinA (Botox) group and 26 percent in the sacral neuromodulation group had at least a 75 percent reduction in the number of episodes of urgency incontinence,” they added.

Incontinence may sound funny, but it’s no joke, the researchers said.

Related: Bed-Wetting Blues Aren’t Just for Kids

“The prevalence of this disruptive condition is common and increases with age, from 17 percent of women older than 45 years to 27 percent older than 75 years in the United States,” they wrote.

And, according to the National Institutes of Health, between 25 percent and 45 percent of all women have some degree of urinary incontinence.

“Women experience urinary incontinence twice as often as men,” the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, part of the NIH, says on its website.

Related: Exercises Help With Incontinence

“Pregnancy, childbirth, menopause, and the structure of the female urinary tract account for this difference.”

The researchers at nine medical centers did a head to head comparison of a single Botox injection to the implanted medical device, assigning 381 women to randomly get one or the other treatment. The women were asked to keep diaries for six months.

Both treatments calm down the nerves responsible for signaling the bladder to empty.

On average, both treatments cut the number of “accidents” – Botox by almost four times a day and the nerve stimulator by about three times a day.

But both groups of women reported equal satisfaction, and more women in the Botox group got urinary tract infections – 35 percent versus 11 percent in the surgery group. Amundsen said it’s not clear why but her team is studyingthis to find out.

Related: Incontinence Affects Young Women, Too

They’re also studying the cost difference. Most women who get either treatment have insurance that pays, Amundsen said.

Incontinence is embarrassing and troubling to men and women alike, who are often unwilling to even tell a doctor. They end up staying close to home and avoiding travel, shopping and visits.

There are different types of incontinence. This study covered urge incontinence, but there’s also stress incontinence, which is caused by pressure on the bladder.

Overflow incontinence is caused when the bladder never really empties. That can be a problem for men with enlarged prostates.

Doctors usually try to start people off with lifestyle treatment, such as weight loss, drinking less caffeine and alcohol, and avoiding lifting heavy objects. Exercises to strengthen the pelvic floor muscles can help, as can “bladder training” to accustom the body to urinating at regular times.

Medications can help as well, although they often have unpleasant side effects such as extremely dry mouth.

 

A new feature to the AllegroMedical.com website just made shopping with us a little easier. If you are not ready to complete your order, or decide to wait to purchase an item in your shopping cart, simply click the “Save for Later” link under the item. With our new Save for Later feature, you can now choose to move an item from your shopping cart and save it to be purchased the next time your return. The item will show up in your Saved for Later section of the shopping cart making purchasing it next time you visit a snap.

I was recently asked to write an article for our friends at the Long Term Living Magazine on the topic of patient care and exercise for mobility challenged patients. It’s an interesting topic and something that deserves focus. Exercise remains a critical component of our lives, no matter what our age or capability. Most all of us are capable of doing some sort of exercise and just might need to think creatively to find the right solution for more challenging cases. Below is the article that was published in the Long Term Living Magazine 5/29/2014. Please enjoy!

Long-term care (LTC) residents who rely on wheelchairs for mobility run a greater risk of diminished mental
acuity and depression, as well as complicated health issues, including Type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure
and coronary heart disease. Pressure sores may develop on those who are confined to a wheelchair, and
excess weight gained from a sedentary life adds strain on the joints of the musculoskeletal system,
contributing to osteoarthritis.

A Journal of the American Geriatric Society study shows that inactive women at age 65 have a life expectancy of 12.7 years, whereas active, nonsmoking women at 65 have a life expectancy of 18.4 years. Other studies have shown that strength training was as effective as medication in reducing depression in older adults.
For residents in wheelchairs, physical exercise is essential for increasing blood circulation, spine stability, posture and
flexibility. Exercise generates endorphins, body awareness and muscle strength while relieving stress and enhancing self esteem for a healthier and happier life. What’s more, exercise improves a resident’s ability to achieve a deeper and more restful sleep, which is essential for preserving emotional and physical health.

For some residents, medical conditions may exclude certain chair exercises. Also, for those just starting exercise regimens, it is imperative that each person discusses his or her individual exercise plan with a physician, who can offer some suggestions or prohibit chair exercises that may be either too strenuous or too likely to aggravate an existing medical condition.

HELPING LTC RESIDENTS HELP THEMSELVES
Regardless of the resident’s age, physical condition or whether he or she ever has exercised in the past, several techniques can help a resident overcome his or her mobility issues. Be sure to consult with a physician to determine what exercises are appropriate for each resident. Any type of exercise will benefit a person’s health but, in general, clinicians should aim to incorporate these important types of exercise into the wheelchair user’s routine:

Basic leg crosses. Leg crosses are good options for seniors who have at least mid-range leg strength. The goal is to simply get the muscles working.

  • Have the patient carefully kick his or her leg out.
  • Have the person cross the legs and then alternate.
  • Repeat this task a number of times.
  • Finish up the exercises with ankle circles.

Cardiovascular. A series of seated, repetitive movements will raise the resident’s heart rate and help to burn calories.

  • Wrap a lightweight resistance band under the wheelchair and have the resident perform resistance exercises, such as chest presses, for a count of one second up and two seconds down. Have him or her try several different exercises to start, with 20 to 30 reps per exercise, and gradually increase the number of exercises, reps and total workout time as endurance improves.
  • Have the resident punch the air with or without hand weights.

Strength training. If the resident has limited mobility in his or her legs, focus on building upper body strength.

  • Have the individual sit straight up in the wheelchair and lift up both arms toward the ceiling, and then slowly move them back down. Alternate the movement by lifting up one arm while the other is stretched out toward the ground, similar to picking apples off a tree. Repeat these movements eight times.
  • Have him or her perform exercises such as shoulder presses, bicep curls and triceps extensions using light weights. Aim for two to three sets of 8 to 12 repetitions for each exercise, adding weight and more exercises as strength improves.
  • Resistance bands can be attached to furniture, a doorknob or the wheelchair. They can be used for pull-downs,shoulder rotations and arm and leg-extensions.

Flexibility. Flexibility is important for enhancing range of motion, preventing injury and reducing pain and stiffness. Even with limited mobility in the legs, a resident still can benefit from stretches and flexibility exercises to prevent or delay further muscle atrophy.

  • Stretching can be performed by having the resident use the floor or his or her body weight to provide resistance to the muscle group being stretched. An occupational therapist should be on hand to help target musclesand joints by helping the person stretch beyond his or her usual range of motion.

Chair Chi. This exercise program is based on the principals of Tai Chi and Qi Gong but designed for residents in LTC
environments. Chair Chi requires no special equipment but can be used to help people receive the benefits of traditional Tai

Chi and Qi Gong.
Most movement in Chair Chi begins and ends with the muscles and back, and can include any number of poses. Motion
remains mostly slow—the slower, the better the results. Working against gravity, the body weight provides resistance as
great as some weight-bearing activities and, according to the Mayo Clinic, Chair Chi is a zero-impact exercise.
Yoga. Most yoga poses can be modified or adapted depending on the resident’s physical condition, weight, age, medical
condition and any injury or disability. Wheelchair yoga is an exceptional option for residents with chronic obstructive
pulmonary disease or multiple sclerosis.
Exercising is equally important for wheelchair users as it is for able-bodied LTC residents, and perhaps even more important given their susceptibility to other conditions. Despite the mobility restrictions wheelchair users face, wheelchair exercise can be a rewarding way of maintaining good health and mental ability. As a group activity, exercise for wheelchair users also can serve as a fun social activity that can be integrated into a daily and weekly schedule.
Getting wheelchair users on a consistent exercise routine tailored to their needs and abilities will help them attain better flexibility and range of motion, greater strength and energy, relief from pain and increased tranquility. It can also help improve breathing capacity for residents with asthma and emphysema, while burning fat and calories, lowering cholesterol and helping to alleviate symptoms of osteoporosis, osteoarthritis, arthritis, bursitis, tendonitis, fibro/polymyalgia and neuropathy.

wheelchair exercise for the elderly

Nursing home residents are physically frail, and possibly approaching the end of their lives. So what’s the point of exercise, especially for someone in a wheelchair?  Too often, I believe, professionals and staff in long-term care environments accept this defeatist attitude.

Unfortunately, this then passes on to the resident and becomes a self-fulfilling prophecy: Long-term care residents in wheelchairs avoid exercise and decline further.

Lack of activity leads to joint degeneration, heart problems, stroke, congestive heart failure, diabetes, and a range of other chronic medical conditions including blood clots and painful, persistent pressure sores.

On the other hand, study after study lately has shown that exercise, even by frail elders, improves cardiovascular health, cognition, and overall quality of life. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says that exercise benefits people with arthritis by reducing pain, delaying disability, and improving mobility, function, and mood. Other studies have shown that strength training was as effective as medication in reducing depression in older adults. It can help improve breathing for residents with asthma and emphysema, while burning fat and calories, lowering cholesterol, and helping to alleviate symptoms of osteoporosis, osteoarthritis, arthritis, bursitis, tendonitis, fibro/polymyalgia, and neuropathy.

 

Obviously, nursing home residents in wheelchairs are as prone as anyone to sedentary living. One of the most common consequences of using a wheelchair is weight gain, resulting from a more sedentary lifestyle. Yet even for this population, physical exercise is essential for increasing blood circulation, spine stability, posture, and flexibility.

Exercise generates endorphins, body awareness, and muscle strength, while relieving stress and enhancing self-esteem. What’s more, exercise improves a patient’s ability to achieve a deeper and more restful sleep, which is essential for preserving emotional and physical health.

For some residents, medical conditions may exclude certain chair exercises. Also, for those just starting out their exercise regimens, it is imperative to discuss any exercise plan with a physician. Yet in my years as a rehabilitation specialist caring for individuals recovering from strokes and traumatic brain injury, and now as a supplier of wheelchairs to people needing them, I have concluded that, regardless of the resident’s age, physical condition, or whether or not the person exercised in the past, there are a number of techniques for helping a chair-bound individual overcome mobility issues.

Exercises for Wheelchair Users

Any type of exercise will benefit wheelchair-bound residents’ health, but in general, clinicians should aim to incorporate these important types of exercise into their routines:

Basic Leg Crosses — These are good options for seniors who have at least mid-range leg strength. The goal is to simply get the muscles working.

  • Have the patient carefully kick one leg out, cross the legs, and then alternate. Repeat this task a number of times. Finish up the exercises with ankle circles.

Cardiovascular – A series of seated repetitive movements will raise the patient’s heart rate and help the person burn calories.

  • Wrap a lightweight resistance band under the wheel chair and have the resident perform resistance exercises, such as chest presses, for a count of one second up and two seconds down. Have the person try several different exercises to start, with 20 to 30 reps per exercise, and gradually increase the number of exercises, reps, and total workout time as endurance improves.
  • Have the wheelchair bound resident punch the air with or without hand weights.

Strength Training – If the resident has limited mobility in his or her legs, focus on building upper body strength.

  • Have the person sit straight in the wheelchair and lift both arms toward the ceiling and then slowly bring them back down. Have them alternate the movement by lifting up one arm while the other is stretched out toward the ground, similar to picking apples off a tree. Repeat these movements 8 times each.
  • Have the person do shoulder presses, bicep curls, and triceps extensions using light weights. Aim for 2 to 3 sets of 8 to 12 repetitions for each exercise, adding weight and more exercises as strength improves.
  • Instead of weights, resistance bands can be attached to furniture, a doorknob, or the wheelchair. They can be used for pull-downs, shoulder rotations, and arm and leg-extensions.

Flexibility is important for enhancing range of motion, preventing injury, and reducing pain and stiffness. Even with limited mobility in the legs, a resident can delay further muscle atrophy by stretching. Stretching can be performed by having the resident use the floor or their body weight to provide resistance to the muscle group being stretched. An occupational therapist should be on hand to help them target muscles and joints and to stretch beyond their usual range of motion.

 

  • Chair Chi is an exercise program based on the principals of Tai Chi and Qi Gong, tailored to people in long-term care environments. Requiring no special equipment, the movements are circular and never forced; the muscles are relaxed rather than tensed; and the joints are not fully extended or bent. Motion remains mostly slow – the slower, the better. Working against the body’s weight provides resistance as great as some weight lifting, with zero impact.

 

  • Yoga poses can be modified or adapted to the resident’s physical condition, weight, age, medical condition, and any injury or disability. Wheelchair yoga is an exceptional option for residents with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or multiple sclerosis.

 

Exercising is just as important, and perhaps even more important, for wheelchair users as for able-bodied long-term care residents. Despite mobility restrictions, wheelchair users can find exercise a rewarding way of maintaining good health and mental ability. As a group activity, wheelchair exercise also can serve as a social activity in the weekly schedule.

 

Better flexibility and range of motion, greater strength and energy, improved breathing capacity, relief from pain, increased tranquility—who would want to deny any of that to a person just because he or she is sitting in a wheelchair?

 

About the Author

Craig Hood is executive vice president of Allegro Medical, a supplier of home medical supplies and equipment. He has worked as a rehabilitation specialist caring for individuals recovering from strokes and traumatic brain injury. He formed Allegro Medical to supply products for post-acute care and the treatment of chronic conditions.

“Help is at hand” was the title to the recent New York Post article that featured a number of AllegroMedical.com’s innovative home medical products that make life easier for those with limited mobility. In my interview with the newspaper, I was challenged to highlight a handful of products that have dramatically enhanced the lives of people living with disabilities of physical challenges. Considering that we offer over 37,000 products on our website, and add thousands of new products each year, choosing the top 10 was not easy.

 

Our picks for the New York Post segment all stand out to me in 2 key ways:

1)   Improvement of mobility

2)   Increased Independence

Better mobility and enhanced independence leads to improved quality of life. In some of these products the genius seems so simple.  These great products make so much sense, that when you look at them, you can’t help but say, “ I wish I thought of that!”

Take a look at the items we highlighted as most helpful for the New York Post and visit www.AllegroMedical.com to find countless other innovative health care products.

Product #1)

The Maddak Sliding Rotating Transfer Bench –

A design possibly inspired by Disneyland’s Tea Cups ride, this transfer bench allows the user to glide the expanse across the bathtub edge and then easily rotate into a comfortable position for showering. Also notable, this product manufactured by Maddak is made in the USA.

Product #2)

The UpEasy Seat Assist –

This product is the equivalent of having a friend in your living room to lend a hand whenever the need arises to get up from your favorite chair. A set of pistons store the energy captured when sitting down on the padded seat cushion. When it’s time to get up, the struts provide a boost to the seat helping you reach a standing position.

Product #3)

The Luggie FreeRider Portable Mobility Scooter –

Like something out of a James Bond movie, this micro mobility scooter folds down into its own suite case, not much bigger than airplane carry-on bag. If 007 were ever issued a mobility scooter it would have to be the Luggie FreeRider.

Product #4)

The Inogen One G3 Portable Oxygen Concentrator –

Oxygen concentrators produce an endless supply of O2 for patients at home but are tethered to an electrical outlet. Portable oxygen tanks offer users mobility but only until the tanks run dry. The Inogen One G3 is the best of both worlds. It is a back pack sized oxygen concentrator that can continuously produce O2 for patients for up to 9 hours on a single charge of its double pack. If required, the unit can also be plugged into a car power source or standard wall outlet and run indefinitely.

Product #5)

The SimpliciKey Electronic Door Lock –

Loss of dexterity from age, arthritis or other conditions can make something as simple as turning the deadbolt lock on your front door a challenge. The SimpliciKey is a motorized deadbolt lock that can be operated by a remote pendant with just 2 buttons; open and close.

Product #6)

Michael Graves Suction Cup Grab Bars –

These grab bars install without tools and provide a sturdy hand-hold in any bathroom shower. The innovative design allows the grab bars to be positioned in any number of ways to ensure safe entry and exit from the bath or shower. The design also incorporates a sensor mechanism that indicates the strength of the suction. If it does not have a good grip on the surface, it tells you.

Product #7)

ABENA Abri Premium Adult Briefs –

The European company ABENA is making fast inroads into the US with their line of ultra-comfortable adult incontinence briefs. Made from Air Plus, their patented soft material, the Abri adult briefs are more comfortable than the standard adult pull-ups on the market. With the addition of stronger elastic in the waist and crotch, and layers of moisture trapping fabric, the Abri has more capacity than other products in the same class. From a recent survey of incontinence users done by Allegro Medical, we found that comfort was the biggest consideration when buying incontinence products followed closely by capacity. The Abri Premium Adult Briefs score high in both categories.

Product #8)

iHealth Wireless Arm Blood Pressure Monitor –

Monitoring your personal health is getting easier with the introduction of wireless health monitors by iHealth. This blood pressure monitor transmits information directly to your mobile device, allowing you to measure and track your systolic/diastolic numbers, heart rate, pulse wave, and measurement time.

Product #9)

iHealth Wireless Pulse Oximeter –

Like the iHealth blood pressure monitor, this Pulse Oximeter transmits vital information wirelessly to your mobile device, reporting on oxygen saturation levels and pulse rate. Part of a family of 3 innovative wireless health monitors, the pulse oximeter makes it easy and quick to get readings and then email results to physicians and caregivers.

Product #10)

iHealth Wireless Activity and Sleep Tracker –

Wearable activity monitors are becoming more widely used and the iHealth Wireless Activity monitor is one of the latest to hit the market. It tracks walking, running, distance traveled and calories burned. It also tracks your sleep efficiency, or how restful you slumber, which has a direct impact on health.
Wireless technology in health devices and mobile apps will continue to emerge in 2014. Don’t be surprised if these products begin communicating with each other, creating an even smarter interconnected view of our total health picture.

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